Infographic: 5 Smart Ways to Eat Less Sugar

Infographic: 5 Smart Ways to Eat Less Sugar

There are many good reasons to reduce the amount of sugar in your diet. Here’s how to do it.

Two hundred years ago, the average American ate about 2 pounds of sugar a year. The average American now consumes almost 152 pounds of sugar annually. Sugar is the most common ingredient added to foods in the U.S. It is found in places you would expect, like candy, cookies and soda. But sugar is also added to many processed foods even if they don’t taste sweet.

Sugar has been linked to a variety of health issues from obesity and diabetes to heart disease and cancer. Reducing the amount of added sugar in your diet is a healthy lifestyle choice. This infographic shows 5 ways to get you started…

Infographic 5 Smart Ways to Eat Less Sugar

Copyright 2018-2021 © Baldwin Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved.
Health eCooking® is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Cook eKitchen™ is a designated trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein without the express approval of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

Date Last Reviewed: September 27, 2021

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Nora Minno, RD, CDN

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The Difference between Substance Use and Abuse

The Difference between Substance Use and Abuse

These are some signs that casual substance use has crossed the line to substance abuse.

Have you ever wondered if there’s a specific point at which substance use becomes substance abuse?  Also referred to as substance use disorder, alcoholism or drug addiction, the National Institute on Drug Abuse defines substance abuse as “a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.”

A substance is something a person willingly ingests that alters their brain, affecting mood or thought processes. These substances can be legal or illegal, or in the case of marijuana, legal in some places but not in others. They are typically consumed with the goal of experiencing euphoria, easing sadness, reducing stress, eliminating pain or blurring difficult memories. Or they’re simply used as a way to relax and have fun.  Some of the most common substances used and abused include:

  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Prescription drugs, especially opioid pain medication
  • Cocaine, heroin, methamphetamines and other street drugs

Many people believe they can use some substances responsibly, such as when they consume a few alcoholic drinks with friends on the weekend or take a couple of painkillers when their back hurts. But all of these substances are addictive, meaning they have the power to take over a person’s life if used regularly.

Although there is no finite line that separates use from abuse, there are several signs that indicate that casual or social use of a substance has turned into dangerous abuse. It is likely abuse or addiction if the person:

  • Has developed a physical dependence on the substance
  • Experiences withdrawal symptoms if temporarily stopping usage
  • Has intense cravings for the substance
  • Is experiencing health complications from use of the substance
  • Has lost the ability to perform normal daily activities (like caring for children, going to work or even getting out of bed in the morning)
  • Feels powerless to stop using the substance despite any of these issues

If you suspect that someone you care about has a substance abuse problem or if you’re worried about your own substance abuse issues, it’s important to get help. The first step is admitting there’s a problem and being willing to seek help to combat the addiction. Treatment for substance use disorder includes support groups, counseling, biofeedback and medications.

Copyright 2020-2021 © Baldwin Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. 
Health eCooking® is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Cook eKitchen™ is a designated trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein without the express approval of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

Date Last Reviewed: January 30, 2020

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Perry Pitkow, MD

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No information provided by Baldwin Publishing, Inc. in any article is a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical condition. Baldwin Publishing, Inc. strongly suggests that you use this information in consultation with your doctor or other health professional. Use or viewing of any Baldwin Publishing, Inc. article signifies your understanding and agreement to the disclaimer and acceptance of these terms of use.

 

The Link Between Physical and Mental Health

The Link Between Physical and Mental Health

If you think your mind and body don’t affect each another, think again.

It’s easy to think of our minds and our bodies as being completely separate. But nothing could be further from the truth—they are intricately connected to each other.

The fact is that people with chronic health conditions are at a higher than normal risk of developing a mental health condition. Those with mental health conditions are also at a higher than normal risk of developing serious physical conditions. In many cases, it becomes a vicious cycle that’s hard to escape. A serious health condition can lead to depression and anxiety, which can worsen the health condition or lead to others, which can increase the person’s depression and anxiety symptoms, and so on.

There are a number of ways in which our mental health can affect our physical health and vice-versa. Here are some examples:

  • A mental health condition can make it harder for you to deal with a chronic illness. If you’re depressed or anxious, you might not have the energy or motivation to follow up with the recommended treatment for your health issue. Without proper treatment, your physical condition could get worse, which might lead to increased depression or anxiety. On the flip side, being diagnosed with a serious illness can cause you to develop a mental health condition in the first place.
  • A mental health condition might cause disruptions in sleep patterns. Sleep is essential for good health. It’s meant to help us recharge our brains and our bodies. Regularly sleeping less than 7 hours per night increases your risk of serious health conditions, including obesity, heart disease and diabetes. Sleeping too much can cause the same health issues, plus headaches and back pain. Not getting enough quality sleep can also affect your immune system, which makes it difficult for you to ward off illnesses.
  • A person experiencing a serious physical illness, injury or mental health condition might engage in dangerous behaviors. Some people turn to alcohol, drugs or cigarette smoking as a way to cope with both physical and mental health issues. Drinking too much alcohol can contribute to heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, liver disease, pancreatic disease and cancer. Illegal drugs take a heavy toll on the heart and nervous system, which can lead to seizures, hemorrhaging and heart attacks. Cigarette smoking is a proven risk factor for asthma, emphysema, heart disease, diabetes and cancer.
  • People with mental illness are less likely to seek routine medical care, such as annual physicals. Preventive visits include essential screenings—like blood pressure, weight and cholesterol checks, among others—which help detect and manage health conditions. It is much easier to manage health conditions that are caught early and are well-controlled compared to when routine medical care has been skipped or recommendations ignored.

Copyright 2021 © Baldwin Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. 
Health eCooking® is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Cook eKitchen™ is a designated trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein without the express approval of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

Date Last Reviewed: August 16, 2021

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Perry Pitkow, MD

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No information provided by Baldwin Publishing, Inc. in any article is a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical condition. Baldwin Publishing, Inc. strongly suggests that you use this information in consultation with your doctor or other health professional. Use or viewing of any Baldwin Publishing, Inc. article signifies your understanding and agreement to the disclaimer and acceptance of these terms of use.

 

Natural Ways to Lower Your Cholesterol

Natural Ways to Lower Your Cholesterol

You have the power to improve your numbers with these healthier habits.

Recently updated cholesterol guidelines by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association may result in millions more Americans being prescribed cholesterol-lowering statin drugs than ever before.

But statins aren’t the only option when it comes to a healthier heart. Some people can manage high cholesterol with lifestyle changes alone. Others may still need medication to get their numbers where they need to be, but by adopting healthier habits, it may be possible to take a lower dosage.

You have the power to lower your bad cholesterol (LDL) and raise your good cholesterol (HDL) with a few lifestyle changes. Why not give these a try?

  • Get moving. Buy a fitness tracker or pedometer and aim to walk at least 10,000 steps every day. You don’t have to do all your daily activity in one spurt. Extra steps during the day add up, so take the stairs instead of the elevator, park farther from your destination or walk to a co-worker’s desk instead of sending an email.
  • Change what’s on your plate. Reduce saturated fat and eliminate trans fats from your diet. Avoid fried and processed foods and limit full-fat dairy and fatty cuts of meat. Reduce the amount of sugar you eat and instead choose foods high in fiber and full of antioxidants. Fill your plate with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, legumes and lean sources of protein.
  • Lose weight. If you’re overweight, losing even a small amount of weight can lower your LDL numbers. Come up with a plan that allows you to not only drop a few pounds, but keep them off.
  • Stop smoking. Here’s another good reason to quit. Smoking can raise LDL (bad cholesterol) and lower HDL (good cholesterol). Within a year of quitting, participants from one study saw HDL levels rise 5%.
  • Relax. Downshifting is crucial to good health and can keep cholesterol levels in check. Take some time each day to slow down, chill out and have some fun. Unplug from mobile devices. Laugh. Stress hormones can increase cholesterol and pave the way for heart disease.

With all of these lifestyle adjustments, start slow and adapt your habits over time. In order to positively affect your heart health, you have to be able to live with the changes you make for the long term.

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Health eCooking® is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Cook eKitchen™ is a designated trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein without the express approval of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

Date Last Reviewed: January 3, 2019

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Elizabeth Kaback, MD

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Is a Laugh a Day the Key to a Healthy Heart?

Is a Laugh a Day the Key to a Healthy Heart?

When it comes to your heart, here’s why laughter really may be the best medicine.

It may sound like a barrel of monkeys, but research suggests that a good laugh may just be the punch line for good health.

The Science behind Your Funny Bone

When you laugh, your brain activates a series of neurons called a reward pathway. The reward pathways triggered by humor cause a sense of euphoria and can lead to a reduction in stress.

Chronic high levels of stress interrupt sleep and can cause a host of health issues, from heart disease and diabetes to depression and anxiety. Laughter, on the other hand, does the opposite. In addition to easing stress, research suggests laughing may decrease blood pressure, reduce artery inflammation, increase HDL (“good” cholesterol), lessen pain, reduce muscle tension, improve your immune system, boost morale and enrich your quality of life. Although research on the subject is limited, results suggest that a laugh a day may be just what you need to keep your heart healthy and improve your overall well-being.

Laugh Therapy Is No Laughing Matter

Today, humor therapy is often used as part of an integrated regimen to treat chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer and asthma. Convinced about the benefits of laughter for older adults, a hospital in Washington, DC even created a “Laugh Café” where seniors meet for hour-long laugh sessions.

If you’re looking for an easy way to help improve your health, don’t forget to laugh each day. Hang out with funny people, read a humorous book or see a silly movie. While humor is contagious, its only temporary side effects are shortness of breath and a sore belly but it can provide a host of long-term benefits.

Copyright 2017-2021 © Baldwin Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. 
Health eCooking® is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Cook eKitchen™ is a designated trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein without the express approval of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

Date Last Reviewed: March 17, 2017

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

Medical Review: Perry Pitkow, MD

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No information provided by Baldwin Publishing, Inc. in any article is a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical condition. Baldwin Publishing, Inc. strongly suggests that you use this information in consultation with your doctor or other health professional. Use or viewing of any Baldwin Publishing, Inc. article signifies your understanding and agreement to the disclaimer and acceptance of these terms of use.

 

A Good Laugh Is Good Medicine

A Good Laugh Is Good Medicine

Want to feel better? Have more energy? Watch a silly video.

You’ve heard the expression a million times: “Laughter is the best medicine.” It’s not just an old saying. Research links laughter to a number of health benefits.

Studies have credited laughter with improving a number of health markers. According to the American Heart Association, laughing every day can reduce inflammation, increase circulation and increase good cholesterol. It’s also been shown to lower levels of cortisol, a hormone often linked to stress. In combination, these benefits can lower the risk of heart disease.

Finding your funny can also alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety. For example, in a study conducted by researchers at Indiana University Media School, viewers of online cat videos reported feeling “more energetic” with “fewer negative emotions.”

Plus, it just feels good to genuinely, truly laugh. A great big belly laugh generally means you’re enjoying yourself, which is always a good thing.

So keep watching those silly cat videos on YouTube. Assemble a Netflix lineup of your favorite comedies. Read a funny book. Whatever makes you laugh, have it at the ready for the next time you have a less-than-optimal day. These things aren’t just for fun anymore—they’re therapy.

Copyright 2016-2021 © Baldwin Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. 
Health eCooking® is a registered trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Cook eKitchen™ is a designated trademark of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein without the express approval of Baldwin Publishing, Inc. is strictly prohibited.

Editorial Review: Andrea Cohen, Editorial Director, Baldwin Publishing, Inc. Contact Editor

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No information provided by Baldwin Publishing, Inc. in any article is a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical condition. Baldwin Publishing, Inc. strongly suggests that you use this information in consultation with your doctor or other health professional. Use or viewing of any Baldwin Publishing, Inc. article signifies your understanding and agreement to the disclaimer and acceptance of these terms of use.